Tennis Rules About Calling A Ball Out

Calling a Ball Out
Calling a Ball Out

Calling a ball out is a common tennis rule that is often confusing for beginners.  

Essentially, calling a ball out means warning your opponent that you will throw the ball in their direction.  

This can be useful if you think your opponent is about to hit the ball into your court or if you think they are playing unfairly.  

If your opponent does not comply with your warning, you have the right to throw the ball in their direction.  

You cannot call a ball out of bounds in the opponent’s court. Additionally, you cannot call a ball out of bounds when the ball is: 

  • In the hand of the opponent 
  • On the ground within your court 

If you think that a ball is out of bounds, it is best to raise your hand and ask your opponent to check the ball.  

Keep these rules in mind when playing tennis, and you’ll be able to play quickly and confidently! 

How to Call a Ball Out in Tennis? 

When you are playing tennis, there are a few standard rules that you must follow.  

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One of these rules is called calling a ball out. If you think your opponent may be about to hit the ball into your court or if they are playing unfairly, you can call their attention to it by shouting “out.”  

If your opponent does not comply with your warning, you have the right to throw the ball in their direction.  

You cannot call a ball out of bounds if it is either in the hand of the opponent or on the ground within your court – only when it is in your hand or on the court can you throw it out. 

If you are unsure whether or not a ball is out of bounds, it is always best to ask your opponent.  

They can then check the ball for you and let you know if it is, in fact, out of bounds.  

Remember to play fair and be aware of your surroundings when playing tennis – this will make the game much more enjoyable for both players! 

When to Call an Out in Tennis? 

Here are the scenarios where you would call out in tennis: 

1. Opponent is about to hit the ball into your court: 

If you think your opponent is about to hit the ball into your court, raise your hand and shout “out” to let, them know.  

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If they do not stop playing with the ball, you have the right to throw it in their direction. 

2. Opponent is playing unfairly: 

If you believe your opponent has been playing unfairly, call out “out” to let them know.  

This could include stopping halfway through a rally or hitting poor shots purposely towards your court to waste time and energy on defense rather than offense.  

You can throw the ball in their direction if they continue to play without correcting their behavior. 

3. Ball is in your hand or on the court: 

You can throw it out only when the ball is in your hand or on the court.  

For example, if you are serving and the ball bounces off someone else’s body and ends up in your opponent’s court, you cannot call an out. 

4. Ball is out of bounds: 

You cannot call an out if the ball is out of bounds (for example, it has gone over a fence).  

The best action would be to ask your opponent for confirmation that the ball is indeed out of bounds and then play according to their instructions. 

5. Ball is out of play: 

You cannot call an out if the ball has gone out of play (for example, if it has fallen off a table). You would then have to catch the ball and restart the rally from where you left. 

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6. Player is injured: 

If you believe someone on your team is injured, call out “out” to let them know.  

It would allow the other players a chance to take their place in the match and consult with a trainer. 

7. Time is running out: 

If you realize that the match will end soon and your opponent has not finished playing the ball, you can call out “time” to signal them that it is time to stop.  

Please be aware that this should only be done if there is a real danger of the match ending prematurely. 

8. Player is fouling: 

If you believe one of your opponents is fouling, call out “foul” to let them know. This would allow you to correct the situation and avoid penalties. 

9. Player is stalling: 

If you notice that your opponent is taking too long to play the ball or making deliberate errors, call out “stalled” to let them know.  

This would allow you to take control of the match and win it for your team. 

10. Violation of rules: 

If you notice that someone on your team has violated a rule, call out “violation” to let them know. This would allow you and the referee to take appropriate action. 

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The Rules of Calling Balls Out 

Here are the rules that should be followed for calling balls out: 

1. Direction the ball is being played: 

When calling out “out,” always specify which player or players you are referring to (for example, “to the right”). This will help your opponent know where to go to try and catch the ball. 

2. Confirm that the ball is out of play: 

Once you have called out “out,” it is crucial to ensure that the ball in question has gone out of play.  

To do this, you can ask your partner if they can see the ball bouncing anywhere else on the court. If not, it is safe to assume it has gone out of play. 

3. Report the ball out of play to the referee: 

If you are certain that the ball has been called out and is no longer in play, it is essential to report this information to the referees to take appropriate action.  

For example, a player attempts to catch the ball after it has gone out of bounds, but before it touches the ground outside the playing area, their opponent would be allowed to score a point on this possession. 

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4. Let your opponent know when you are calling balls out: 

It is essential to let your opponent know when you are calling balls out to avoid any confusion.  

For example, if you are playing defense and notice that your teammate has been calling balls out on the offense, make sure to alert them so they can adjust their play accordingly. 

5. Be aware of your surroundings: 

It is always important to be aware of your surroundings to avoid potential conflicts.  

For example, if you are calling balls out and notice that the other team has a player positioned near the ball, moving away from this area might be a good idea. 

6. Rely on your instincts: 

If you are unsure whether a ball is out of play, it is best to rely on your instincts.  

If you feel that the ball may be in danger of being touched again, then it is probably best to call it out. 

7. Be prepared to explain your call: 

If you call about the ball being out of play, it is vital to be prepared to explain this decision to your teammate.  

For example, if you decide that the ball has gone out of bounds, it might be helpful to say something like, “The ball went out of bounds on the other side.” 

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8. Don’t get angry: 

If you make a call about the ball being out of play, and your opponent does not seem to understand, don’t get angry.  

Instead, try to explain the situation again in a more transparent manner. If this fails, it is probably best to concede the point without further protest. 

9. Be respectful of your opponents: 

When calling balls out, being respectful of your opponent is essential.  

For example, if they are playing defense and you call the ball out on their side of the court, it is polite to let them know about this decision so that they can adjust their play accordingly. 

10. Stay calm under pressure: 

Even the best players can sometimes make mistakes when calling balls out. If you feel pressured to make a correct call, staying calm and focusing on the task is crucial. 

What If You Call A Ball Out When It’s Not? 

If you call a ball out when it is not in play, your opponent may be allowed to touch it again. This can often lead to a blown opportunity or even a lost point.  

It is essential to be aware of this and ensure that all calls about the ball being out of play are accurate.  

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If your opponent touches the ball after you have called it out, you may be penalized with a penalty. 

Plus, your opponent may be able to argue your call and claim that the ball was, in fact, in play.  

So it is imperative to be sure that your calls are correct. 

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